Dong Zhuo turned to Li Su and asked what these things portended.

Dong Zhuo turned to Li Su and asked what these things portended.

“It means that you are going to receive the abdication of the Hans, which is to renew all things: To mount the jeweled chariot and sit in the golden saddle.”

And Dong Zhuo was pleased and convinced with this answer. During the second day’s journey a violent gale sprang up, and the sky became covered with a thick mist.

“What does this mean?” said Dong Zhuo.

  the wily Li Su had an interpretation for this also, saying,

“You are ascending to the place of the dragon: There must be bright light and lurid vapor to dignify your majestic approach.”

  Dong Zhuo had no more doubts. He presently arrived and found many officials waiting without the city gate to receive him,

all but Li Ru who was ill and unable to leave his chamber.

He entered and proceeded to his own palace, where Lu Bu came to congratulate him.

  “When I sit on the throne, you shall command the whole armies of the empire, horse and foot,” said Dong Zhuo.

  That night Dong Zhuo slept in the midst of his escort. In the suburbs that evening some children at

play were singing a little ditty, and the words drifted into the bedchamber on the wind.

  [hip, hip, hip]“the grass in the meadow looks fresh now and GREen, Yet wait but ten days, not a blade will be seen.”[yip, yip, yip]

  the song sounded ominous but Li Su was again prepared with a happy interpretation:

“It only means that the Lius are about to disappear, and the Dongs to be exalted.”

  [e] the staff, the cloth, and the mouths formed the Chinese characters, implied the name of Lu Bu.

Next morning at the first streak of dawn,

Dong Zhuo prepared for his appearance at court. On the way he saw a Taoist,

dressed in a black robe and wearing a white turban,

who carried in his hand a tall staff with a long strip of white cloth attached.

At each end of the cloth was drawn a mouth*.

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