Gu Fangzhou, a virologist who invented sugar pills, left

  Gu Fangzhou, a virologist who invented “sugar pills”, has gone to develop “sugar pills” to eradicate polio in China. He once said “one thing in a lifetime”

Professor Gu FangzhouBeijing Youth Daily reporter learned from Peking Union Medical College

of Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences that at 3:35 on January 2, 2019, a famous medical scientist and

virologist who developed a vaccine to eradicate polio in China, Comrade Gu Fangzhou, former president and first-class professor of Peking

Union Medical College of Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, died in Beijing at the age of 92 because of ineffective medical treatment.

  According to the Beijing Union Medical College of the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences,

Mr. Gu Fangzhou’s farewell ceremony is scheduled to be held at 9 a.m. on January 8, 2019, in the second

floor of the underground section building of the East Hospital of the Peking Union Medical College.

  ChanceAfter graduation, enter the “battlefield” of polio

  ”Choose one thing for a lifetime” is a true portrayal of Mr. Gu Fangzhou. On January 3, the official website of Peking Union Medical College

of the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences published an excerpt from Xu Yuan’s article Gu Fangzhuan, The Ark of Life for Protecting the Health of Chinese People – The Life of

Virologist Gu Fangzhou, which mentioned that Gu Fangzhou was born in 1926 and his ancestral home was Ningbo, Zhejiang Province. Because

of his father’s early death, Gu Fangzhou’s family was depressed, and he was discriminated against quite a few times.

  Gu Fangzhou recalled in an interview before his death that when he was young, his mother had taught

him many times to “strive for gas.” Later, when he was a doctor, people begged you, you did not ask others.

In 1944, he was admitted to the Medical Department of Peking University Medical College with excellent

results. But on the eve of graduation, Gu Fangzhou abandoned the highly paid and respected profession

of surgeon and chose to engage in public health, which was just starting, poor in foundation and low in value.

  Gu Fangzhou once mentioned in his autobiography that this “turn around” was influenced by many factors. One is the active guidance

of Mr. Yan Jingqing, a public health expert; the other is the real feeling of the national conditions and

the people outside the classroom; the other is the experience of Dalian Institute of Health, which has

carried out vaccine research and production, engaged in the research of dysentery.

  For Gu Fangzhou, it is a coincidence of opportunity that he is engaged in the “battlefield” of polio. In

1955, a large-scale outbreak of poliomyelitis occurred in Nantong, Jiangsu Province, which is commonly known as “polio”.

At that time, 1680 people in Nantong City were suddenly paralyzed, mostly children aged 0-7 years old. The epidemic resulted in 466 deaths, and

quickly spread to Qingdao, Shanghai, Jining, Nanning and other places. For a time, polio was like a terrible flood, and everybody smelled it.

  Gu Fangzhou mentioned before that in the 1950s and 1960s, there were tens of thousands of children

disabled by polio every year. “We feel guilty because there is no way to help them and cure them.”

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